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Dachshund

The Dachshund dates back to the fifteenth century. Many accept the theory that the breed originated in Germany, although there is evidence that suggests that the breed may also have been present in Greece, Egypt, China and Mexico. The Dachshund was originally developed to hunt badgers, but they are also well-suited for hunting larger game. In 1888 the German Dachshund Club was founded and a breed standard was developed in an effort to promote a dog that was as beautiful as it was intelligent. Three different coats are associated with the breed, including the smooth coat, long coat and wirehaired coat. Dachshunds also come in different sizes including standard, medium and miniature.
Genetic Diseases that can be tested for:

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Progressive Retinal Atrophy - Cord 1 (Miniature Long-Haired, Miniature Smooth-haired, Miniature Wire-Haired, Kaninchen)

Australia / NZ statistics:
42.3% of dogs tested (Combine Dachshund data) were either affected or carriers

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Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (Miniature Long-Haired, Standard)

Australia / NZ statistics:
No information is currently available - keep checking this page for updates

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MERLE (Standard, Dapple)

Australia / NZ statistics:
No information is currently available - keep checking this page for updates

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Please be aware that other genetic diseases or developmental abnormalities may still be present. A genetic test does not replace the need for ongoing clinical assessment by a veterinarian. Disease penetrance and clinical assessment of affected animals can only be performed by a qualified veterinarian.

Disease Statistics provided by breed club health committies and member bodies